59 Children Injected with a Single Needle

Lauren Lollini is a patient safety advocate who has been integral in changing laws to keep patients safe as well as a member of the Drug Diversion Prevention Committee.
Lauren Lollini is a patient safety advocate who has been integral in changing laws to keep patients safe as well as a member of the Drug Diversion Prevention Committee.

On March 3rd, the India Times reported an incident where 59 children were injected with the same syringe and needle while being administered an antibiotic. This not only highlights the many issues surrounding the state-run hospitals there, but also illustrates the point we, at HONOReform, have been helping to bring to light.


In our blog last week, Evelyn McKnight spoke about our colleagues throughout the world who are concentrating their efforts on injection safety. The article, which I have included below, demonstrates one of many injection safety lapses that occur throughout the world—both in developing and developed countries. HONOReform is determined to help safeguard the medical injection practices here in the United States and beyond our borders. Please let this serve as a call to our many colleagues—industry, government and public health—to join us to make this stand.

India Times Story

After reading the article, I know some may ask, “How can such a horrific error occur?” Or perhaps ask, “How can they have no precautions?”

Both are very fair questions.

The thing I asked after reading the article was “How are the children?” As a mother of a 7 year old, I know that at all times her safety is the most important thing in my life. I had a quick flashback to 6 years ago as I sat in a hospital with my then 1 year old and held her as she screamed and cried while the phlebotomist drew some blood from her. I remember singing and trying to calm her down as the little needle went into her hand, the whole while fearing she might have also been infected with Hepatitis C as I had been due to unsafe injection practices. Perhaps in the few weeks before my diagnosis and after my infection, we had shared some blood unknowingly. I pictured the active virus raging through my blood and thought the horrible thoughts of what I might do if my daughter also was infected.

So, too, the parents in India held these same fears; their outrage, their concern, their lack of control. If we cannot make changes for the most innocent of victims, the young, how can we even think to make changes for all?

Once again, I use this as a call to action. Until everyone understands the risks involved, our job as the heralds of injection safety is far from over.

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