July 2017

Unsafe Injections transmit Infections!

Unsafe Injections transmit infections
World Hepatitis Day is July 28

As we commemorate World Hepatitis Day, we remember that unsafe infections transmit infections. We are grateful to the World Health Organization for its efforts in preventing viral hepatitis globally. Many cases of viral hepatitis are transmitted by unsafe injections. Following is a poster to guide healthcare providers in administering safe injections.

 

 

Unsafe injections transmit infections
Guidance from the World Health Organization for safe injections

Make Smart Injection Choices

 

Smart Injection Choices
World Hepatitis Day is July 28

The World Health Organization reminds us that we need to make smart injection choices. Following are the questions that the WHO suggests we ask our healthcare provider before we receive an injection to help us make smart injection choices. Unsafe injections spread diseases such as viral hepatitis. When we communicate with our healthcare providers we make good decisions and healthcare improves.

Make smart injection choices
Make smart injection choices

Unsafe injections can transmit hepatitis

World Hepatitis Day
World Hepatitis Day is July 28

World Hepatitis Day is later this week, but it is not too early to prepare! Today we share information about unsafe injections which can transmit hepatitis.

Today we are sharing a poster prepared by the World Health Organization on making smart injection choices. Do you know how to make sure medical injections are safe for you and your family?

Please take a look at the poster and share with your networks. Watch for more information this week. But most importantly, do what you can to make sure injections don’t transmit hepatitis!

Unsafe injections transmit disease
Unsafe injections transmit hepatitis

 

World Hepatitis Day is July 28

World Hepatitis Day
World Hepatitis Day is July 28

World Hepatitis Day is later this week, but it is not too early to prepare! This week we will be sharing information about these deadly diseases and how to prevent them.

Today we are sharing an infographic prepared by the World Hepatitis Alliance on the number of cases, causes and cures of Hepatitis B and C. Did you know that the mortality rate has increased by 22% since 2000?

Please take a look at the infographic and share with your networks. Watch for more information this week. But most importantly, do what you can to eliminate hepatitis!

 

NoHep
We can eliminate hepatitis!

Drug diversion exposes patients to disease

Drug diversion exposes patients to disease
Thousands of patients are exposed to disease through drug diversion

These days, we see drug diversion incidents appear in the news at an increasing rate. 28,000+ patients were potentially exposed to Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) through drug diversion. All of this was due to the carelessness of HCV-infected health care providers.

While its tempting to dismiss as a rare happening, this high exposure rate can happen anytime without proper precautions. For example, one surgical technician caused 18 cases of HCV infection with more than 8000 total patients impacted across three facilities. This single event resulted in a 30-year prison sentence for the diverter.

Although these numbers are staggering, it is easy to lose sight of the fact that these numbers represent real people. These people’s lives were devastated because a healthcare provider tampered with needles, syringes or medication vials to get ‘high’. These people could have been your child, your spouse, your mother. If you access healthcare, it could happen to you. The irony is that these people acessed healthcare seeking better health, but in the process, were exposed to a deadlly disease. And the situation is completely preventable with procedures and policies in place that are designed to prevent drug diversion.

Drug diversions can spread more than HCV. Other infections diseases associated with drug diversion include: pseudomonas pickettii, serratia marcescens, achromobacter xylosoxidans, ochrobactrum anthropi, stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and klebsiella oxytoca. It’s imperative to educate yourself on these diseases and how they can spread from drug diversion.

Patient safety is of the utmost importance, so arm yourself with knowledge of how to prevent, address, and handle drug diversions. Ensure all of your syringes and saline solution are not compromised or tampered with. Check out the infographic below from Diversion Central by Omnicell for more information.

Omnicell Technologies and Solutions

 

Drug diversion through tampered syringes

Promoting injection safety for all
HONOReform’s mission is to promote injection safety

Medical Xpress, a publication of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, recently reported a cluster outbreak of Serratia marcescens, a gram-negative bacteria, due to drug diversion through tampering of syringes

The enlightening article describes how drug diversion through syringe tampering happens, its ramifications (including loss of life), and efforts to prevent it.

Drug diversion by healthcare workers is a growing problem in the United States. We must learn from outbreaks such as this if we hope to prevent others from happening.

The article is reprinted here in its entirety.

Narcotics diversion results in outbreak of serratia marcescens bacteria

July 6, 2017 in Medicine & Health / Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

An illegal diversion of opioids by a hospital nurse tampering with syringes was responsible for a cluster outbreak of Serratia marcescens, a gram-negative bacteria, according to research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Five patients admitted to five different hospital wards within University Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin developed identical bacteria strains. Upon investigation, hospital epidemiologists linked the cases with the tampered syringes, the nurse was immediately terminated, and no further S. marcescens cases were identified.

“This incident sadly adds to the handful of healthcare-associated bacterial outbreaks related to drug diversion by a healthcare professional,” said Nasia Safdar, MD, PhD, senior author and epidemiologist at the University Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin. “Our experience highlights the importance of active monitoring systems to prevent hospital-related drug diversion, and to consider this potential mechanism of infection when investigating healthcare-associated outbreaks related to .”

Hospital staff first identified four hydromorphone and six morphine syringes in an automated medication dispensing cabinet that had been tampered with. This discovery occurred almost immediately after detection of the S. marcescens , prompting a controlled substance diversion investigation (CSDI) by key hospital staff.

Hospital epidemiologists conducted a review of blood cultures and molecular fingerprinting to identify the origin of the S. marcescens outbreak, concluding the possible connection between the cluster of infections and the narcotic diversion. Further analysis suggested four of the five exposed patients had contracted S. marcescens during a short-term post-operative stay in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit, where the worked. The fifth patient, who was the nurse’s father, had been exposed to the bacteria prior to his admittance.

The investigation found that the suspected nurse had accessed the medication cabinets where the tampered medication was stored. Testing of the tampered syringes suggested the nurse had replaced the active medication within the syringes with a saline or other solution, likely causing the S. marcescens outbreak. Four of the five patients recovered, while one died from Serratia sepsis infection.

As a result of the outbreak, the hospital team implemented additional diversion detection and security enhancements including tamper-evident packaging and installation of security cameras.

More information: Leah M. Schuppener et al, Serratia marcescens Bacteremia: Nosocomial Cluster Following Narcotic Diversion, Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology (2017). DOI: 10.1017/ice.2017.137

Provided by Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

“Narcotics diversion results in outbreak of serratia marcescens bacteria” July 6, 2017 https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-07-narcotics-diversion-results-outbreak-serratia.html

 

© Copyright 2016 HONOReform